Presumptions Can Kill You

Presumption: An attitude or belief dictated by probability.

What you do right before you know something bad is going to happen often determines how the bad event will end.

     A common discussion in the self-defense circles is the idea of awareness. We are constantly told be aware of our surroundings. No matter what anyone has suggested, it just doesn’t work all the time.

     For that reason I came up with a more inclusive idea of being aware. A FBI study found that there were certain traits that police officers have that make them more or less prone to being killed in the line of duty. One of those traits was the idea to always follow rules no matter what they are seeing. Those officers that cut corners on the rules were prone to being killed. These rules came about due to other officer’s mistakes.

     Developing rules are how civilians can order their life with safety in mind. It also shows when they need total awareness for short periods of time. It is also nothing more than learning from others mistakes and incorporating those lessons into our own routines until they become habits.

     I gave an example of this in an earlier post while talking about how to answer your door. Almost all bad things that occur to us come down to us making presumptions. If you are expecting your buddy to come over in an hour and there is a knock at your door, chances are that the person at your door is your buddy. That use of chance works right up until it doesn’t. When it’s a home invader then your ability to overcome the invader is much less than if you had looked out a window or peephole.

     This is the idea behind my, “What if” posts. Taking the time, before anything bad happens, to develop a set of rules and corresponding habits that will make your life more enjoyable and much more safe. Once these habits are in place I have found very specific times that I have to put my head on a swivel and pay attention.

     I would like to give you a short list. The list is the thought process I went through to develop which, “What if’s” I need. I will write a second list that has a set of generic rules in a later post.

A threat assessment of my current life looks something like this:

Confronted in my home, burglary/home invasion.

Confronted in my yard or outbuildings.

Confronted while I drive my car or stopped in traffic.

Confronted in parking lots whether in my car or walking.

Confronted in public buildings, work, store, etc.

     This isn’t such a long list. Developing good, “What if’s” for each of these is a good idea.

 

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2 comments

  1. tv

    One of those traits was the idea to always follow rules no matter what they are seeing. Those officers that cut corners on the rules were prone to being killed. These rules came about due to other officer’s mistakes.

    I wonder if you will share those rules in a new post and draw parallels to citizen CHL holders – if possible.

    Thank you.

    Like

    • Retired

      Thanks for the comment.

      I probably could have phrased “Always following the rules” in a better way. The idea of rules written in blood is a long standing military and police tradition. Pretty much all police training has some rule from failures of the past. That would mean most all my posts are about the same topics of education that officers learn. Making a list with no context would be very hard.

      I did a recent post about my personal rules. As I state in that post the idea of rules has to have a context. It is more important to know what the spirit of the rule is. Sometimes the rules will be broken.

      What I referred to in this post is that some officers were not following the rules out of laziness or with the mistaken belief that they could overcome any difficulties they find due to ignoring the rule. Sort of an idea that for them the outcome would be different from the past.

      Liked by 1 person

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