OneGun’s Rules for Training

As usual I am having some fun with the title. These are my rules, not yours. They are suggestions for you to think about. They are not all-inclusive. I will add more. Many of these rules are explained in more detail in other posts.

Safety

  1. Safety first: Don’t lose your first gunfight by shooting yourself or an innocent person during training or practice.
  2. Never go fast on the range without first going fast during dry fire. A mistake in dry fire is a click before you are on target. A mistake in live fire is the pistol going off before you are on target. The bullet is going into the floor, someone else, you?
  3. There is no reason to holster quickly.
  4. There is no reason to holster without looking at the holster.
  5. Most self-inflicted gunshots occur during holstering due to an obstructed trigger (clothing, brass, your finger) or pistol cleaning (you didn’t unload it properly).

When just starting out or when going back to the fundamentals

  1. Learn one skill at a time, mixed with one book learning. i.e. learn to grip the pistol, then read your state’s burglary statute (change this to other laws as you learn and study them).
  2. You can only put so much information in your head in a 24 hour period.
  3. Place at least 24 hours between learning sessions. That’s how long it takes for your training to consolidate and get put into long-term memory. This is true for book learning and skill learning.
  4. When first learning something new, start slow. Never speed up until you can perform the task perfectly. If perfection starts to break down, find out why. Slow down and start again.
  5. After training get a good nights sleep with the sleep occurring within 12 hours of training.
  6. Training done in the afternoon seems to stick in your memory more than morning training (perhaps because you need to sleep within 12 hours of your training to maximize your long-term memory recall?)
  7. Don’t make training more complex until you have made the easy gains. Think 80% of the gains for the 20% of the effort.
  8. Make the easy gains in all areas before buying training. Easy gains in State Law, Case Law (how state law is applied means usually buying a book), in movement (all directions during dry fire and on the range), shooting and your what-if’s. Then move to advanced fundamentals. Don’t be an expert shooter but not understand WHEN to shoot someone legally. All areas take practice and training.

Dryfire.

  1. Start first on SLOW perfect dry fire.
  2. Dry fire is where you calibrate your flash front sight. When you are on target with your front sight focus, stop and check the relationship of front and back sight. You can train to have them all lined up fairly well in dry fire.
  3. After you can slowly perform several tasks accurately on command, mix them up by using Interleaved Training. Instead of practicing task AAA then BBB then CCC practice ABCABCABC or ABCBCACAB.
  4. Sometimes it is difficult to see mistakes in the draw, reload, etc when dryfiring because there is no bullet to provide feedback. As you speed up, having a training partner video a few repetitions will show any inconsistencies or inaccuracies.
  5. As your speed increases you should combine different skills. Draw while moving in various directions. Do this first during dryfire, then live fire.

Live fire.

    1. Start with slow accurate live fire. Live fire will usually lag behind dry fire in speed.
    2. Increase speed slowly and only as you can maintain accuracy or technical perfection.
    3. Increased speed while maintaining accuracy comes from repeatedly speeding up while concentrating on maintaining accuracy. As you start to miss your six inch target with 20-30% of your shots. Slow back down, regain your accuracy and start again to speed up.
    4. After you can slowly perform several tasks accurately on command, mix them up by using Interleaved Training. Instead of practicing task AAA then BBB then CCC practice ABCABCABC or ABCBCACAB.
    5. When new, shooting speed often comes when we realize that we do not need to perfectly align the front and rear sight. It’s called flash front sight not line up both sights.
    6. When increasing distance slow back down and shoot for accuracy.
    7. When you are shooting a group where your mistakes are not easy to see, it’s time to speed up your rhythm from that distance and to move farther back from the target and shoot slow. You can do both during the same session. A type of interleave training.
    8. When you feel like you are performing all your tasks quickly and smoothly it is time to start testing the tasks.
    9. Testing is done in two ways, accuracy and speed. As your speed increases you should combine different skills. Draw while moving in various directions. This is always done first in dryfire, then live fire.
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